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A shared vision to grow BJJ – 2019

The world of Brazilian Jiu Jitsu is expanding rapidly, with the sport's recognition and participation on the global platform seeing dramatic growth at an unprecedented rate.
by Luis Costa
A shared vision to grow BJJ – 2019
The world of Brazilian Jiu Jitsu is expanding rapidly, with the sport's recognition and participation on the global platform seeing dramatic growth at an unprecedented rate.
by Luis Costa

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The Brazilian Jiu Jitsu world is expanding. The sports’ recognition and participation on the global platform is seeing dramatic growth at a rapid rate. With new gyms steadily popping up and existing and new brands and initiatives expanding and evolving with new concepts all the time, the shared gain of expanded awareness and participation is being felt by the industry. As an independent brand, witnessing this common objective and dedication towards growth within our industry is encouraging.

In this latest blog we’re looking at our recently announced partner, one of Brazilian Jiu Jitsu latest additions which shares our vision to grow our BJJ, Grappling Industries.

Grappling Industries is a Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu and Submission-Wrestling Gi and No Gi tournament featuring a unique round robin format. Acting as the middlemen between grapplers and gyms everywhere, Grappling Industries vision is to develop a platform used throughout the world for competitors to distinguish themselves from each other. The brand is committed to creating an enabling environment conducive to the development of BJJ and Submission-Wrestling. Born out of Montreal, Canada, the brand sought to provide more competition opportunities locally. It now runs several competitions a year in Canada and has been a staple on the Australian circuit for the last few years as well. Here in Oz, 2019 is set to be their biggest year yet with plans to run the event circuit 4 times next year, each time visiting 4 States (Victoria, New South Wales, Queensland and South Australia). Being BJJ competitors themselves, the guys really understand what the industry needs and their competitors want. It is an honour to work alongside them.  We will be supporting Grappling Industries by showcasing our pop up shop at each of the events but not in the format you may have seen before…..product launches, huge promotions, giveaways and much more will be on offer. We’re excited to represent our industry in new and innovative ways, it’s always about giving back.

We’re stoked to be on this journey with another growing brand focused on the growth of the sport. At the end of the day, it is a shared passion for Brazilian Jiu Jitsu that brings us all together. Our focus as a network needs to remain on the sport itself and how we can continue to obtain opportunities to enjoy our sport and each other. The future depends on what we do now…..The fight Never Ends.

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Benefiting from a competitive loss

Benefiting from a competitive loss

“Benefiting from a Competitive Loss” is the next insightful piece of our mindset series presented by trauma, mindset and performance coach Briana Bowley.  This deep dive into mindset limitations shows us how bringing awareness and intent to the forefront of your game can alter both the experience, the lessons and the outcome.  Enjoy! Kicking off our mindset series, Briana Bowley, esteemed trauma, mindset and performance coach , explores imposter syndrome; what it is and how to deal with it on and off the mats. It’s always an honour to collaborate with such knowledgeable individuals whose insights truly can provide valuable advantage to our game.  Enjoy! As a mindset coach, my clients commonly express a desire to experience a more balanced, focused and relaxed mindset in preparation for, and on the day of, competition. When the pressures of wanting to win are partnered with the stresses of not wanting to lose, it’s common to feel mentally and emotionally tense and perform in a way that is less than one is capable of. It is for this reason that it’s vital that your driving force for competing becomes greater than simply winning (or avoiding losing) a competition. The more inspired and intentional your vision and the driving force behind your actions, the more objective you are and the more capable you will become in navigating both challenge and support in the pursuit of it. The more connected you are to your vision, the less reactive to the smaller day to day or moment by moment challenges you are, because you’re able to zoom out and see each success and failure as nothing more than a feedback mechanism to keep you growing, improving and realigning with a deeper meaning. I regularly encourage my clients to tune into what the vision is ‘beyond the vision,’ and to begin to claim ‘the thing beyond the thing.’ In other words, asking themselves what jiu jitsu means to them beyond simply training jiu jitsu. If this is not something you’ve thought about before, I highly encourage you to consider the following prompts to support you in benefiting from past loses and to avoid diminishing your future competitive performances. These prompts are many of the very same prompts that I use with my clients. Identify your objective. What drives your jiu jitsu as a whole? What drives you to train / compete? Is your love of jiu jitsu driven solely by a desire to become a great jiu jitsu practitioner or is it something more nuanced? (Don’t be afraid to get really honest with yourself here!) Maybe jiu jitsu provides you with a way to improve your self defense skills. Maybe it serves as an additional opportunity to socialise or maybe you enjoy the strategy components and mental aspects of the game. It’s important to consider whether competing is purely an experience-based pursuit for you, or whether it’s something that you desire to turn into a career, an income or as a platform for further impact or to spread a particular message. Once you’ve identified your objective, consider what success within this realm might specifically look like for you. Once you’re aware of your driving force and what success is to you within that arena, you’re opening up the definitions of success and failure beyond the tiny box of simply ‘winning’ or ‘losing’ and thus, minimising the emotional feedback mechanism that inevitably comes as a result of winning or losing. Identify how a loss is of service to your greater objective. (This one might be somewhat of a mind-bender, so the invitation is here to really take the time to reflect). When your objective is something bigger than simply adding another tick to the win column, you’re able to identify how your competitive ‘failures’ and losses have actually been deeply of service to you and ultimately another key piece in leading you to your desired outcome.  With this overarching perspective you’re able to take whatever happens and use it to your greatest advantage. You’ll no longer fear a loss and any limiting attachments to a win, will be eased. Bonus step: Identify how a win is a drawback to your greater objective. When you see only benefits to winning a competition you’ll have a ‘white knuckled’ attachment to that result and only that result. Of course, this means that if things don’t go your way, it’s inevitable that your attachment will lead to disappointment and a lingering feeling of failure. When you can balance out your perceptional biases around the result, you’ll no longer be so attached to it and a lack of attachment means that you’ll be able to think, behave and process information through a much more rational, present and focused lense. As an example of what’s possible when you do this work, I previously coached a competitive brown belt who despite being a highly skilled, relaxed and analytical athlete within the context of the safety of training at his gym, found that once he got on the mats in a competitive arena it was like his brain ‘left the building’ and he was no longer able to think straight. In competitions he found himself making silly mistakes that under day to day circumstances he simply would not make. These are common symptoms of a fight, flight or freeze response and is the bodies way of naturally preparing to survive a looming threat. This response, despite being normal to a small degree (after all jiu jitsu IS a fighting sport with genuine physical safety risks), the degree at which the response was ruling him showed me that he had some perceptional attachments to the competition results which were affecting his performance. Together we identified that the driving force behind his competitive jiu jitsu was ultimately the continued marketing and growth of his jiu jitsu gym and to continue to build upon his knowledge to serve as an example for his students. What was playing out behind the scenes was that he would often tell his students that they had his support regardless of whether they were winning or losing their matches. Of course, it only made sense that as the coach, it was important to him that he be an example. This meant that circumstances in which he might lose were actually unconsciously deeply desirable to him. The benefit to his driving force was that he was given the opportunity to be an example of good sportsmanship and maintaining self respect in the event of a loss, whilst also continually coming up against new challenges on the mats which encouraged him to double down on his jiu jitsu studies, improving his overall skill set as a coach. On the flip side, the then unconscious drawback of his wins, were that his performance had the potential of setting a high standard for his students, leading them to feel a lingering pressure to perform well on the mats in order to represent the gym and his coaching well. His loyalty to his students was the thing that was limiting his performance capabilities. He also felt an ongoing pressure that if he performed at the level he knew he was capable of, that it would place him and his coaching skills in the spotlight in a way that he wasn’t, at the time, prepared for or able to handle. There was an underlying unconscious fear that the rapid success of his gym was a responsibility that he could not bear. After we brought these subconscious beliefs, stories and limitations into his awareness he was able to consciously choose which results and their secondary benefits he most desired whilst letting go of the lingering (and overwhelming) attachment to receiving those benefits in a conditional context. From that day onward, this particular client has voiced how much his performance and thought process on competition day has dramatically shifted. No longer does he feel the sense of freezing up and not being able to think clearly on the mats and his pre competition nerves have reduced to a subtle background noise that he is able to easily manage.   He has experienced a long line of dominant and relaxed wins over his opponents and for the occasional loss, he is able to express gratitude for it because it’s clear to him the specifics of how it’s of service to his higher vision. When our goals, vision and intentions are no longer in conflict with our beliefs, stories and perceptions, we free the body and mind up to thrive, as opposed to merely surviving. The truth is, most athletes are performing at a small fraction of their true capabilities because the majority of their attention and energy is being wasted on the war going on within their own head.  What if you could step onto the competition mats without fear or attachment to your results? Imagine how much more focus and attention you’d have to give.

Fitness, Health

Imposter Syndrome

Imposter Syndrome

Kicking off our mindset series, Briana Bowley, esteemed trauma, mindset and performance coach , explores imposter syndrome; what it is and how to deal with it on and off the mats. It’s always an honour to collaborate with such knowledgeable individuals whose insights truly can provide valuable advantage to our game.  Enjoy! Working as a mindset coach, one of the most common challenges that I support my clients in moving beyond, is that of ‘imposter syndrome.’ Imposter syndrome can be defined as a cerebral experience in which one doubts their skills, abilities or talents regardless of external evidence of their competence. It acts as a feedback mechanism (as all emotion-inducing experiences are) to let you know that you’re not viewing yourself with full clarity or that you may be comparing yourself to an incomplete viewpoint of others. At times imposter syndrome might present itself as a fear of being exposed as a fraud or as guilt for deceiving others for not being what one claims to be or ‘should’ be. If you find yourself challenged by imposter syndrome, it can be a crippling experience holding you back from reaching your full potential. However, there are blessings to be found in this experience and my role is to open your eyes to them. Imposter syndrome is usually representative of one of the following three underlying streams of thought: You are expecting yourself to be an expert or to have achieved a level of mastery that is unobtainable at your current level of experience (for example, expecting yourself to train like a black belt when you’re still on your white belt.) You are prone to perfectionist tendencies, struggling with your identity and worth when you make mistakes. You compare yourself to the best of other people and their unique skills, attributes and achievements, without seeing the full picture of their mistakes and shortcomings. In a sport like jiu jitsu, it’s only natural that you find yourself falling into states of comparison, because ultimately we are competing against our peers and testing our skillset against those of another. However, when you draw too much meaning from these comparisons, seeing half-truths in your opponents such as more positives in their skillset than drawbacks and simultaneously focusing on the negatives of yours, you begin facing the feedback of imposter syndrome and dissipating your own self-worth. In the words of Ralph Waldo Emerson, “envy is ignorance and imitation is suicide.” With this, I’d like to share a powerful story of a client of mine and to demonstrate how we can get lost in comparison and risk losing sight of what we want most. This client was a competitive MMA fighter and we had been working together for some time to bring a new level of emotional intelligence, self awareness and presence, to her competitive performances. She had already gained some success and was becoming widely recognized for her profound poise and relaxed demeanor under the immense pressures of competition. Despite being a highly skilled martial artist, she was still considered a white belt in jiu jitsu due to having never attended a grading night. She was matched to fight an MMA bout against a jiu jitsu black belt and for the first time in quite some time, she was heavily doubting her ability to win the match, despite her coaches having full faith in her ability. Her self-esteem as a martial artist had hit an all-time low and she was close to pulling out of the match altogether, despite knowing that her success here could be a groundbreaking next step in her career. After our consultation, I uncovered that she was comparing her skillsets to that of her opponent whilst disregarding her own. She was admiring the black belt level jiu jitsu skills of her opponent – comparing them to her ‘white belt’ ranking and self-depreciating herself despite her skills being far beyond those of a white belt. She was placing her opponent on a pedestal for her belt color, without taking into consideration the full picture of her abilities. While others were able to see my clients overall skill, in particular her black belt level of emotional intelligence (one that is regularly wildly overlooked in combat sports) she continued to minimize herself and fall into imposter syndrome. She was failing to see, and therefore failing to powerfully utilize – every individual has a unique set of advantages and disadvantages. While trapped in this small, limited world of comparison, she was disregarding that just beyond those comparisons was an opportunity to level the playing field and to have the kind of success she had been striving for. As long as you compare yourself to other individuals instead of comparing your own actions and decisions to what’s deeply meaningful to you, you are likely to be distracted by the mislead belief that you’re not enough. You only ever want to ‘fix’ yourself when you’re comparing yourself to another. This dysmorphic response is not limited purely to jiu jitsu or combat sports but can be relevant to every facet of your life. For my client, we worked together in overcoming imposter syndrome and as a result, she won that fight via submission. As a coach, there are a number of ways that we can work together to overcome imposter syndrome. As an example, this is a way for you to begin the process of overcoming imposter syndrome (this is a piece of the puzzle that I utilize in working with my own clients): Step 1. Identify those individuals that you look up to and compare yourself to. Step 2. Identify the traits, actions or characteristics that you admire in them. Step 3. Identify where you have those same traits and characteristics or display those same actions in your own unique form, to the same extent as the person you’re comparing yourself to. Step 4. Continue doing this until you can see, with unwavering certainty, that you are just as competent, skilled and capable as they are, albeit expressed in a unique form. What if you could see yourself clearly through recognizing that whatever you perceive in another, you have in your own form based upon what is most meaningful to you as an individual? What might you be capable of achieving then? For support in this process or to get your unique mindset and performance related questions answered, contact me at briana@brianabowley.com or at www.instagram.com/brianabowley

Braus News

Mica Galvão beats Lo and Hulk to become champion at BJJStars 8; Check the results

Mica Galvão beats Lo and Hulk to become champion at BJJStars 8; Check the results

Last saturday, april 30th, the Brazilian state of São Paulo received one of the biggest grappling events of the country, the acclaimed BJJStars. Although the event’s superfights had fans on the edge of their seats, the middleweight GP, which also had some of the greatest Brazilian athletes from this generation, managed to steal the show. Part of the reason for that was the incredible performance put forth by 18-year-old black belt Mica Galvão, who managed to overcome three strong opponents on his way to the title. Mica’s journey through the GP was not an easy one. After beating Leandro Lo by an advantage and overcoming Mauricio Oliveira because of an injury, the young athlete found himself face-to-face with the experienced Lucas Hulk in the final. The fight was mostly evenly matched until the last minute, when Mica countered one of Hulk’s takedown attempts and managed to reach his opponent’s back, locking a bow-and-arrow choke and cementing his position as the champion of the Grand Prix. Other highlights of the event were Demian Maia, who returned to Grappling after 15 years and managed to lock a tight triangle choke on fellow MMA-fighter Alex Cowboy; Bia Mesquita, who got the win after submitting Julia Boscher with an armlock; and last but not least, Gutenberg Pereira, who only needed 25 seconds to land a guillotine on Fellipe Andrew and finish the bout. Check the complete results below! Middleweight Grand Prix FINAL Mica Galvão submitted Lucas Hulk via bow-and-arrow choke SEMIFINALS Mica Galvão defeated Maurício Oliveira after withdrawal due to injuryLucas Hulk submitted Leo Lara via armlock QUARTERFINALS Mica Galvão defeated Leandro Lo via advantagesMaurício Oliveira defeated Pedro Machado by referee decisionLeo Lara defeated Wallisson Tarta via 5×2Lucas Hulk defeated Roberto Jimenez via 2×0 Superfights Demian Maia submitted Alex Cowboy via guillotineFelipe Preguiça defeated Henrique Ceconi who received two punishmentsGutemberg Pereira submitted Fellipe Andrew via guillotineFabricio Andrey defeated Alex Sodré via referee decisionBia Mesquita submitted Julia Boscher via armbarMarcos Pectho submitted Lucas Protasio via guillotineMariana Rolszt submitted Thais Loureiro via armbar

Braus News

West Coast Trials champions set their sights on ADCC 2022; check the results

West Coast Trials champions set their sights on ADCC 2022; check the results

With high stakes and even higher performances displayed throughout the event, the ADCC West Coast Trials has taken over the West Gate Hotel in Las Vegas and completed its goal: selecting the next batch of athletes that’ll return to the Nevada city in the long-awaited ADCC 2022, in September. Among the many talents shown in the tournament, BJJ blue belt Jacob Rodriguez managed to set himself apart from the rest, submitting every single opponent that crossed his path in the competition. Unstoppable Submission Skills Jacob Rodriguez's performance at the ADCC West Coast Trials was nothing short of extraordinary. Despite being a BJJ blue belt, he showcased his exceptional skills by submitting every opponent he faced. His submission rate of 100% is a testament to his technical prowess and determination. A Rising Star in the BJJ World Jacob Rodriguez's dominant performance at the ADCC West Coast Trials has put him on the map as a rising star in the Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu world. His ability to consistently submit his opponents demonstrates his deep understanding of the sport and his dedication to honing his craft. The Importance of Submission Skills In Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, submission skills are crucial for success. Being able to submit an opponent means having complete control over the fight and being able to force them to tap out. Jacob Rodriguez's flawless execution of submissions highlights the importance of mastering these techniques in order to excel in the sport. Technical Mastery and Strategy Jacob Rodriguez's success can be attributed to his technical mastery and strategic approach to each match. By carefully studying his opponents and identifying their weaknesses, he was able to capitalize on opportunities and secure submissions. His ability to adapt and adjust his game plan in real-time is a testament to his intelligence and skill. Inspiration for Aspiring BJJ Practitioners Jacob Rodriguez's remarkable performance serves as an inspiration for aspiring Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu practitioners. It shows that with dedication, hard work, and a deep understanding of the sport, even a blue belt can achieve extraordinary feats. His journey serves as a reminder that success in BJJ is not solely determined by belt rank, but by the skills and mindset one brings to the mat. A Bright Future Ahead With his exceptional performance at the ADCC West Coast Trials, Jacob Rodriguez has undoubtedly caught the attention of the BJJ community. As he continues to train and compete, it is clear that he has a bright future ahead. We can expect to see more impressive displays of skill and determination from this rising star in the years to come.

Braus News

The 12 labors of Catriel Oliveira in the UAE

The 12 labors of Catriel Oliveira in the UAE

In the early hours of that Friday, April 8th, 2021, during breakfast, Braus athlete Catriel Oliveira had the first Jiu Jitsu Herculean challenge of the day, a big dose of discouragement coming from a whisper nearby: “Sebastian Rodriguez from Unity is on a roll! He is the best athlete in the tournament. It’s impossible to beat him at 85kg ”. Enrolled in the same division, Catriel had moments of anxiety at the table while eating at that hotel in Abu Dhabi. But the hours leading up to his brown belt duels at World Pro 2021 would be to scare off this old ghost of his day, which would be epic. What is the World Pro 2021? The World Pro 2021 is one of the most prestigious Jiu Jitsu tournaments in the world. It brings together top athletes from different weight divisions to compete for the title of the best in their category. The competition is fierce, and only the most skilled and determined fighters make it to the top. Who is Catriel Oliveira? Catriel Oliveira is a talented Jiu Jitsu athlete representing Braus. With years of training and dedication, he has become a force to be reckoned with in the sport. Catriel has faced numerous challenges throughout his career, but his passion and determination have always pushed him to overcome any obstacles in his path. Conquering the Ghost Despite the discouraging whispers about Sebastian Rodriguez's dominance in the tournament, Catriel refused to let fear consume him. He knew that in order to succeed, he had to believe in his own abilities and focus on his own game plan. Catriel used the hours leading up to his duels to mentally prepare himself and visualize his success. A Display of Skill and Determination When it was finally time for Catriel to step onto the mat, he unleashed his skills with precision and determination. His technique was flawless, and his strategic moves left his opponents stunned. Match after match, Catriel showcased his expertise and proved that he was a force to be reckoned with. Overcoming the Odds As Catriel advanced through the rounds, he faced tough opponents who were equally determined to win. However, Catriel's unwavering focus and relentless drive allowed him to overcome every challenge that came his way. He refused to let doubt or negativity creep into his mind, and instead channeled all his energy into each match. A Historic Victory After a grueling day of intense battles, Catriel emerged victorious. He had conquered his fears, silenced the whispers of doubt, and proved that he was a true champion. Catriel's victory at the World Pro 2021 will forever be remembered as a historic moment in his career. Inspiring Others Catriel's journey serves as an inspiration to aspiring Jiu Jitsu athletes around the world. His story reminds us that with hard work, dedication, and belief in oneself, anything is possible. Catriel's epic triumph over adversity is a testament to the power of the human spirit and the limitless potential within each of us. So the next time you face a daunting challenge, remember Catriel Oliveira's story. Let it fuel your determination and push you to conquer your own personal battles. Just like Catriel, you have the power to overcome any obstacle and achieve greatness.

Braus News

Paulo Miyao and the key to live life strategically

Paulo Miyao and the key to live life strategically

Paulo Miyao, one of the most renowned Jiu Jitsu fighters in the world, recently sat down with Graciemag to share his insights on guarding and tactical planning. As a Braus Fight athlete, Miyao has achieved great success in the sport and has become a respected figure in the Jiu Jitsu community. In this interview, he not only revealed his secrets but also discussed the challenges of building a new team in the heart of New York. What is the Importance of Guarding in Jiu Jitsu? Guarding is a fundamental aspect of Jiu Jitsu that allows a practitioner to defend themselves from their opponent's attacks and create opportunities for counterattacks. According to Miyao, a strong guard is essential for success in the sport. He emphasized the importance of maintaining a solid base, controlling the distance, and using effective grips to establish a dominant position. How Does Tactical Planning Play a Role in Jiu Jitsu? Tactical planning is crucial in Jiu Jitsu as it involves strategizing and adapting to different situations during a match. Miyao stressed the significance of studying opponents' techniques and tendencies to develop effective game plans. He emphasized the need for patience, precision, and timing when executing techniques, highlighting the importance of being proactive rather than reactive. What Challenges Did Paulo Miyao Face in Building a New Team in New York? Moving to a new city and building a team from scratch is no easy feat, even for a seasoned athlete like Miyao. He shared the challenges he faced in establishing a new training environment and finding like-minded individuals who shared his passion for Jiu Jitsu. However, through perseverance and dedication, Miyao successfully built a strong team that supports and motivates each other. How Does Jiu Jitsu Help Paulo Miyao in His Personal Life? Jiu Jitsu is not just a sport for Miyao; it is a way of life. He explained how the discipline, mental fortitude, and problem-solving skills developed through Jiu Jitsu have positively impacted his personal life. Miyao believes that the lessons learned on the mats, such as resilience, respect, and humility, can be applied to everyday challenges and interactions. Paulo Miyao's insights into guarding, tactical planning, and his personal journey in Jiu Jitsu provide valuable lessons for both aspiring and experienced practitioners. His dedication to the sport and his ability to overcome challenges serve as an inspiration to all who strive for excellence in Jiu Jitsu and in life.

Braus News

Thalison Soares and the importance of undertaking in Jiu-Jitsu

Thalison Soares and the importance of undertaking in Jiu-Jitsu

“I used to live in a one-room house with my mother and two sisters, beside an 'Igarapé'”, explains Thalison Soares, recalling the beginnings of his life before investing in a professional career in Jiu-Jitsu.

Braus News

Roger Gracie’s 7 tips to improve your Jiu Jitsu game

Roger Gracie’s 7 tips to improve your Jiu Jitsu game

7 tips to improve your Jiu Jitsu game, Throughout his many years practicing and competing in Jiu-Jitsu, the ten-time world champion Roger Gracie has gathered a vast knowledge of the gentle art and the necessary steps to evolve in the sport.

Braus News

World Jiu Jitsu Championship 2021 : Black Belt Results

World Jiu Jitsu Championship 2021 : Black Belt Results

With breathtaking duels and a real show of technique for fans of the sport, this year's IBJJF Jiu-Jitsu World Championship came to an end. Last Sunday,

Braus News

Thalison Soares and the importance of entrepreneurship in Jiu-Jitsu

Thalison Soares and the importance of entrepreneurship in Jiu-Jitsu

“I used to live in a one-room house with my mother and my two sisters, beside a stream,” says black belt Thalison Soares, recalling the beginnings of his life.

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